Sir Kenny Dalglish’s best Liverpool moments

Sir Kenny Dalglish’s best Liverpool moments

In Liverpool folklore, few people command the same level of respect as the legendary Sir Kenny Dalglish.

As a player, his legacy was 515 games, 172 goals, six league titles and three European Cups, and he added 11 more trophies as a manager across two different spells, 1985-91 and 2011-12. As you can see, he’s a pretty big deal.

His list of best moments could easily hit treble figures, but we’ve tried to narrow them down to just ten unforgettable memories from Dalglish’s time at Anfield

Lured away from Celtic for a British record fee of £440,000, Dalglish was immediately thrown into the Liverpool lineup and he made his league debut against Middlesbrough one week after signing his contract.

It took Dalglish just seven minutes to open the scoring, tapping home a scruffy effort from close range. Nobody had any idea just how wide he had opened the floodgates.

Kenny DalglishKenny Dalglish
Kenny Dalglish would key in Europe for Liverpool | Getty Images/Getty Images

A fascinating sub-plot to the 1977 Super Cup final was that Liverpool met a Hamburg side featuring the man Dalglish was signed to replace, the great Kevin Keegan.

If any Liverpool fans were unsure of Dalglish’s ability to replace Keegan, the Scot made sure there was no doubt at the end of the game.

After a 1-1 draw in the first leg, Liverpool roared to a 6-0 win in the return fixture, with Dalglish grabbing the sixth two minutes before the final whistle. The future was bright.

Perhaps the most famous goal of Dalglish’s career, the Scot stole the headlines as he netted the winner against Club Brugge in the 1978 European Cup final.

Liverpool spent 63 minutes knocking on the door but couldn’t find a way past Brugge’s Birger Jensen, but Dalglish stepped up to save the day with a perfect chip to bring Liverpool their second European Cup.

It was a famous goal and an equally famous celebration. The image of Dalglish hopping the advertising boards at Wembley to celebrate in front of the fans won’t be forgotten anytime soon.

Tottenham rocked up to Anfield with World Cup winners Ossie Ardilles and Ricky Villa in their squad, but both were left licking their wounds as Dalglish inspired Liverpool to an emphatic 7-0 victory.

Dalglish opened the scoring after eight minutes and he bundled home a second 12 minutes later, and he spent the rest of the game hypnotising the Spurs midfield with his unstoppable passing.

He bagged an assist after the break and was involved in a handful of excellent moves, including the build-up to the seventh goal, Terry McDermott’s header, which is fondly remembered as one of the most famous goals in club history.

Sammy Lee, Kenny DalglishSammy Lee, Kenny Dalglish
Dalglish celebrates scoring | Getty Images/Getty Images

241 games into his storied Liverpool career, Dalglish hit his century when he found the back of the net in a 1-1 draw with Ipswich Town in November 1983.

Picking up a short corner, Dalglish cut inside and unleashed a ferocious curling chip which nestled into the top corner perfectly.

When Joe Fagan retired as manager in 1985, Dalglish became the first player-manager in English professional football, and he took his side to Stamford Bridge in May 1986 knowing a win over Chelsea would see Liverpool win the league title.

Not only was Dalglish the mastermind behind the triumph, but it was he who netted the winning goal with an excellent volley, ensuring he won the title in his first season as a manager.

Kenny DalglishKenny Dalglish
Kenny enjoyed a fantastic 1986 as player/manager | Getty Images/Getty Images

One week later, Dalglish had the chance to win the double when his Liverpool side travelled to Wembley to face rivals Everton in the FA Cup final.

Gary Lineker put the Toffees ahead, but a half-time team talk from Dalglish helped inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 victory and a famous league/cup double.

Now more of a manager than a player, Dalglish took a back seat and let his tactics do the talking as he led Liverpool to what the great Tom Finney described as one of the greatest performances he had ever seen.

Brian Clough’s Forest had just knocked Liverpool out of the FA Cup a week earlier, so Dalglish was out for revenge, and he definitely got all the revenge he could have asked for.

John Barnes, John Aldridge, Peter Beardsley and the rest near-enough humiliated Forest, playing around them like they weren’t even there. Liverpool only managed five goals but could have easily had ten.

Just five weeks after 96 Liverpool fans lost their lives in the Hillsborough disaster, Dalglish did his best to restore some positivity to the city when he led his side to FA Cup glory over rivals Everton.

An Everton equaliser took the game to extra time, after which Ian Rush netted twice to give Liverpool one of the most emotional results in club history.

“This game has meant more to me than any other game in which I’ve been involved,” said Dalglish (via ESPN). “It was an emotional experience, one that gave me a deep sense of happiness.”

Kenny Dalglish, Ronnie Moran, Roy EvansKenny Dalglish, Ronnie Moran, Roy Evans
Dalglish celebrates the 1990 league title | Getty Images/Getty Images

Two years after his last appearance, Dalglish made one last outing in Liverpool red in the final home game of the 1989/90 season in a 1-0 win over Derby County.

Liverpool had been crowned champions a few days earlier – their famous 18th title – and they were presented with the trophy after the game, giving Dalglish the perfect send-off.

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